THE PERFECTION REVIEW

THE PERFECTION REVIEW
THE PERFECTION REVIEW

THE PERFECTION REVIEW:- The originals of Netflix are increasingly risky bets. Martin Scorsese explained that the Netflix platform was a place where, far from wanting to plagiarize constantly those formulas that govern the usual Hollywood blockbuster, they wanted to give authors a space to create their works. Without putting limits to his thoughts and giving free rein to each author could feel free in the modus operandi of realization of his feature films and series. Scorsese is one of the few directors who understand that Netflix, or VOD platforms, is a new format to understand cinema.

They do not seek to destroy classics such as Schlinder's list (1993, Steven Spielberg), but to try to find other ways to build films of similar quality. And that is only achieved with the above: giving directors and screenwriters full freedom when telling a story, and not mark them with rules stipulated from production to ensure considerable success at the box office.

The Perfection, Netflix's new original, is undoubtedly one of the best examples of what Scorsese - who is also preparing his own film for the platform, The Irishman - explained. At the behest of Richard Shepard, Perfection wants to be reflected in films like Black Swan (2010, Darren Aronofsky) and Based on Real Events (2017, Roman Polanski) through the strange relationship that two prodigies of music have with it and with their mentors. It is a tangled story of madness, horror and really uncomfortable situations that seem to place it more in the horror genre than in the thriller genre. Taking into account the number of liters of blood that have been scattered on stage and how it develops in a discreet and unexpected way that in the crescendo of gore that accompanies the final revelation of the film -which, obviously, we will not reveals.

THE PERFECTION REVIEW
THE PERFECTION REVIEW

Recently, on the same Netflix, Velvet Buzzsaw of Dan Gilroy landed. Another film that centered its bleeding around art, this time from the most critical and analytical point of view of the works, and the fanaticism that it can provoke in its most staunch admirers. Perfection follows that wake by the artistic fixation but focuses more on the obsessions that can generate looking for that same perfection that receives the title of the film. It's like the B series trash version of Damien Chazelle's Whiplash, which seeks to train the music elite at the price it takes. As much as the students in question who want to reach that level are against the methods used to achieve that perfect goal.

Hence, Allison Williams and Logan Browning are the absolute stars of the show. They leave behind any other character by living in their own flesh that traumatic pressure that is wanting to be the best at something. It establishes a relationship between them almost vampiric in which one is a reflection of the other, only at different times. Complicated to opt for a single actress seeing the talent that breathes in their sequences. It would be a pity if his performances fell into oblivion just because the film does not enjoy a premiere in theaters.

Richard Shepard, a seasoned television director, has managed to portray how far madness can go. Each character, in his own way, for some reasons or for others, would need to go through a madhouse to rebalance his mind. But instead of that everything ends in a spiral of revenge that turns history into an absolute Roman circus of which the spectator is more than a participant.
THE VERDICT

Netflix needs more movies in its catalog as THE PERFECTION, a rare avis within its genre. Full of freedom and few conventions that allow authors to freely express what they want and the way they want. It is not a perfect feature film, it is far from wanting to be that. But like a nightmare for a rainy night or wanting to see something different, Perfection is surely the best bet you're going to have, for now.

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